Saturday, September 26, 2020
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New Documentary Examines History of African American Speech

0

Going insane was a luxury. It’s the going, that’s the treat. Going suggests travel, moving. There was no going. The madness was constant and still, sitting there, like a place on a map. The women in the beautifully brutal film 12 Years A Slave were mangled and maliciously intertwined.

It was where they lived, where they were from, born and bred into mundane inescapable crazy.

This young couple is having a great time

The twisted relationship dynamics between the two lead female characters Patsey and Mistress Epps in 12 Years A Slave are a horror. A painfully vivid illustration of the dank gnarly negotiations women had to make with each other to survive the demonic conditions of American slavery. The film fearlessly exposes a suppurating historic wound between Black and White women so wicked and utterly honest, it is both repulsive and liberating to witness.

We see the dark and sweet Patsey, doubly enslaved by virtue of her race and beauty, sway for a moment, let go like a girl, do a slow twirl. She is loose trying to lose herself, and she slips, for a moment, into a trance induced by the sound of her only friend Solomon’s sad singing violin. His is almost music. She is almost dancing. It is all almost a human moment.

Great article reading on the new smartphone

All of a sudden she goes limp, drops, knocked back into the terror of her life, by a heavy crystal decanter hurled at her head by Mistress Epps.

All of a sudden, she is once again a battered pile of dirty black woman parts wrapped in rags down on the floor. Mistress Epps is hate, full, guided and preserved by it. Patsey, the object, the affliction. She is, in Mistress Epps molested mind, literally the mistress.

Her husband Edwin Epps is addicted to Patsey, a deadly habit he will not kick, not for his wife, not for her dignity nor her sanity. The Mistress publicly demands Edwin rid himself and her home of the disease that is Patsey. He not only refuses his wife, he comfortably humiliates her.

Claiming his desire for the puddle of nasty nigger wench at their feet. The Mistress is frozen, stunned powerless by her husbands white male supremacy while Patsey is dragged away into darkness.

Patsey and the Mistress Epps personify Black and White American women’s painful slave legacy. American slavery was an insidious economic institution devised to benefit a minority of white Christian men, predicated on systemically preventing others access or the ability to establish alliances. Society has discussed how slavery successfully branded Blacks as inferior and sub-human, yet have we ever fully faced the brain washing, torture and rape terrorism practices slavery inflicted on Black and White women?

Are white privileged women jealous because their husbands had sex and lusted after black women right in their faces?

Powerful young woman taking a selfie

Do they believe the enslaved black women, purposefully seduced their white men, did they think they wanted to be raped?

Are black women in the eyes of white women, the original whores, the quintessential sluts? A sickening set of propositions, but the institution of slavery was such a sick situation for women to be in.

An evil woman is easy to understand. Mistress Epps makes clear white women bound in slavery were far more complicated than pure evil. She is in a tumultuous rage.

Never ending pleasure in talking to him

A white woman’s rage: privileged with no position, positioned with no power, powerful with no promise of independence, fidelity or safety.

The white woman could not properly direct her rage at her husband, she could not rail against white male supremacy. She too was in hell and Black enslaved women where the only ones in the chambers bellow her. So she sent her rage down and with her hot hate burned what was left of the bitches.

And the black women scorched beyond human recognition were left in pieces scattered and buried somewhere beneath hell. The concept of hell, like slavery, was designed to control and terrorize for eternity. The relationship between the mistress and the slave woman was so poisoned from its inception it could never be healed.

Is this our original sin? Could this be at the root of why Black women were cut out of the American suffrage movement when it came time for voting rights for women? Why many white abolitionist women turned their backs on the violence against southern Blacks to secure their own right to vote?

Black and White American women were doomed from the start, viciously competitive, inhuman maddening

Women’s movements can’t move in America until we have courageous honest discourse about the sadistic historic foundation of the relationship. We were systematically cultured to distrust and envy each other. We were never meant to be sisters.

Artist Creates Haunting Ode To Black Women Who Have Gone Missing

0

Going insane was a luxury. It’s the going, that’s the treat. Going suggests travel, moving. There was no going. The madness was constant and still, sitting there, like a place on a map. The women in the beautifully brutal film 12 Years A Slave were mangled and maliciously intertwined.

It was where they lived, where they were from, born and bred into mundane inescapable crazy.

This young couple is having a great time

The twisted relationship dynamics between the two lead female characters Patsey and Mistress Epps in 12 Years A Slave are a horror. A painfully vivid illustration of the dank gnarly negotiations women had to make with each other to survive the demonic conditions of American slavery. The film fearlessly exposes a suppurating historic wound between Black and White women so wicked and utterly honest, it is both repulsive and liberating to witness.

We see the dark and sweet Patsey, doubly enslaved by virtue of her race and beauty, sway for a moment, let go like a girl, do a slow twirl. She is loose trying to lose herself, and she slips, for a moment, into a trance induced by the sound of her only friend Solomon’s sad singing violin. His is almost music. She is almost dancing. It is all almost a human moment.

Great article reading on the new smartphone

All of a sudden she goes limp, drops, knocked back into the terror of her life, by a heavy crystal decanter hurled at her head by Mistress Epps.

All of a sudden, she is once again a battered pile of dirty black woman parts wrapped in rags down on the floor. Mistress Epps is hate, full, guided and preserved by it. Patsey, the object, the affliction. She is, in Mistress Epps molested mind, literally the mistress.

Her husband Edwin Epps is addicted to Patsey, a deadly habit he will not kick, not for his wife, not for her dignity nor her sanity. The Mistress publicly demands Edwin rid himself and her home of the disease that is Patsey. He not only refuses his wife, he comfortably humiliates her.

Claiming his desire for the puddle of nasty nigger wench at their feet. The Mistress is frozen, stunned powerless by her husbands white male supremacy while Patsey is dragged away into darkness.

Patsey and the Mistress Epps personify Black and White American women’s painful slave legacy. American slavery was an insidious economic institution devised to benefit a minority of white Christian men, predicated on systemically preventing others access or the ability to establish alliances. Society has discussed how slavery successfully branded Blacks as inferior and sub-human, yet have we ever fully faced the brain washing, torture and rape terrorism practices slavery inflicted on Black and White women?

Are white privileged women jealous because their husbands had sex and lusted after black women right in their faces?

Powerful young woman taking a selfie

Do they believe the enslaved black women, purposefully seduced their white men, did they think they wanted to be raped?

Are black women in the eyes of white women, the original whores, the quintessential sluts? A sickening set of propositions, but the institution of slavery was such a sick situation for women to be in.

An evil woman is easy to understand. Mistress Epps makes clear white women bound in slavery were far more complicated than pure evil. She is in a tumultuous rage.

Never ending pleasure in talking to him

A white woman’s rage: privileged with no position, positioned with no power, powerful with no promise of independence, fidelity or safety.

The white woman could not properly direct her rage at her husband, she could not rail against white male supremacy. She too was in hell and Black enslaved women where the only ones in the chambers bellow her. So she sent her rage down and with her hot hate burned what was left of the bitches.

And the black women scorched beyond human recognition were left in pieces scattered and buried somewhere beneath hell. The concept of hell, like slavery, was designed to control and terrorize for eternity. The relationship between the mistress and the slave woman was so poisoned from its inception it could never be healed.

Is this our original sin? Could this be at the root of why Black women were cut out of the American suffrage movement when it came time for voting rights for women? Why many white abolitionist women turned their backs on the violence against southern Blacks to secure their own right to vote?

Black and White American women were doomed from the start, viciously competitive, inhuman maddening

Women’s movements can’t move in America until we have courageous honest discourse about the sadistic historic foundation of the relationship. We were systematically cultured to distrust and envy each other. We were never meant to be sisters.

Young Architects Fight to Save Historic Building from Developers

0

Going insane was a luxury. It’s the going, that’s the treat. Going suggests travel, moving. There was no going. The madness was constant and still, sitting there, like a place on a map. The women in the beautifully brutal film 12 Years A Slave were mangled and maliciously intertwined.

It was where they lived, where they were from, born and bred into mundane inescapable crazy.

This young couple is having a great time

The twisted relationship dynamics between the two lead female characters Patsey and Mistress Epps in 12 Years A Slave are a horror. A painfully vivid illustration of the dank gnarly negotiations women had to make with each other to survive the demonic conditions of American slavery. The film fearlessly exposes a suppurating historic wound between Black and White women so wicked and utterly honest, it is both repulsive and liberating to witness.

We see the dark and sweet Patsey, doubly enslaved by virtue of her race and beauty, sway for a moment, let go like a girl, do a slow twirl. She is loose trying to lose herself, and she slips, for a moment, into a trance induced by the sound of her only friend Solomon’s sad singing violin. His is almost music. She is almost dancing. It is all almost a human moment.

Great article reading on the new smartphone

All of a sudden she goes limp, drops, knocked back into the terror of her life, by a heavy crystal decanter hurled at her head by Mistress Epps.

All of a sudden, she is once again a battered pile of dirty black woman parts wrapped in rags down on the floor. Mistress Epps is hate, full, guided and preserved by it. Patsey, the object, the affliction. She is, in Mistress Epps molested mind, literally the mistress.

Her husband Edwin Epps is addicted to Patsey, a deadly habit he will not kick, not for his wife, not for her dignity nor her sanity. The Mistress publicly demands Edwin rid himself and her home of the disease that is Patsey. He not only refuses his wife, he comfortably humiliates her.

Claiming his desire for the puddle of nasty nigger wench at their feet. The Mistress is frozen, stunned powerless by her husbands white male supremacy while Patsey is dragged away into darkness.

Patsey and the Mistress Epps personify Black and White American women’s painful slave legacy. American slavery was an insidious economic institution devised to benefit a minority of white Christian men, predicated on systemically preventing others access or the ability to establish alliances. Society has discussed how slavery successfully branded Blacks as inferior and sub-human, yet have we ever fully faced the brain washing, torture and rape terrorism practices slavery inflicted on Black and White women?

Are white privileged women jealous because their husbands had sex and lusted after black women right in their faces?

Powerful young woman taking a selfie

Do they believe the enslaved black women, purposefully seduced their white men, did they think they wanted to be raped?

Are black women in the eyes of white women, the original whores, the quintessential sluts? A sickening set of propositions, but the institution of slavery was such a sick situation for women to be in.

An evil woman is easy to understand. Mistress Epps makes clear white women bound in slavery were far more complicated than pure evil. She is in a tumultuous rage.

Never ending pleasure in talking to him

A white woman’s rage: privileged with no position, positioned with no power, powerful with no promise of independence, fidelity or safety.

The white woman could not properly direct her rage at her husband, she could not rail against white male supremacy. She too was in hell and Black enslaved women where the only ones in the chambers bellow her. So she sent her rage down and with her hot hate burned what was left of the bitches.

And the black women scorched beyond human recognition were left in pieces scattered and buried somewhere beneath hell. The concept of hell, like slavery, was designed to control and terrorize for eternity. The relationship between the mistress and the slave woman was so poisoned from its inception it could never be healed.

Is this our original sin? Could this be at the root of why Black women were cut out of the American suffrage movement when it came time for voting rights for women? Why many white abolitionist women turned their backs on the violence against southern Blacks to secure their own right to vote?

Black and White American women were doomed from the start, viciously competitive, inhuman maddening

Women’s movements can’t move in America until we have courageous honest discourse about the sadistic historic foundation of the relationship. We were systematically cultured to distrust and envy each other. We were never meant to be sisters.

Discover Just How Black Women are Taking Care of Business

0

Going insane was a luxury. It’s the going, that’s the treat. Going suggests travel, moving. There was no going. The madness was constant and still, sitting there, like a place on a map. The women in the beautifully brutal film 12 Years A Slave were mangled and maliciously intertwined.

It was where they lived, where they were from, born and bred into mundane inescapable crazy.

This young couple is having a great time

The twisted relationship dynamics between the two lead female characters Patsey and Mistress Epps in 12 Years A Slave are a horror. A painfully vivid illustration of the dank gnarly negotiations women had to make with each other to survive the demonic conditions of American slavery. The film fearlessly exposes a suppurating historic wound between Black and White women so wicked and utterly honest, it is both repulsive and liberating to witness.

We see the dark and sweet Patsey, doubly enslaved by virtue of her race and beauty, sway for a moment, let go like a girl, do a slow twirl. She is loose trying to lose herself, and she slips, for a moment, into a trance induced by the sound of her only friend Solomon’s sad singing violin. His is almost music. She is almost dancing. It is all almost a human moment.

Great article reading on the new smartphone

All of a sudden she goes limp, drops, knocked back into the terror of her life, by a heavy crystal decanter hurled at her head by Mistress Epps.

All of a sudden, she is once again a battered pile of dirty black woman parts wrapped in rags down on the floor. Mistress Epps is hate, full, guided and preserved by it. Patsey, the object, the affliction. She is, in Mistress Epps molested mind, literally the mistress.

Her husband Edwin Epps is addicted to Patsey, a deadly habit he will not kick, not for his wife, not for her dignity nor her sanity. The Mistress publicly demands Edwin rid himself and her home of the disease that is Patsey. He not only refuses his wife, he comfortably humiliates her.

Claiming his desire for the puddle of nasty nigger wench at their feet. The Mistress is frozen, stunned powerless by her husbands white male supremacy while Patsey is dragged away into darkness.

Patsey and the Mistress Epps personify Black and White American women’s painful slave legacy. American slavery was an insidious economic institution devised to benefit a minority of white Christian men, predicated on systemically preventing others access or the ability to establish alliances. Society has discussed how slavery successfully branded Blacks as inferior and sub-human, yet have we ever fully faced the brain washing, torture and rape terrorism practices slavery inflicted on Black and White women?

Are white privileged women jealous because their husbands had sex and lusted after black women right in their faces?

Powerful young woman taking a selfie

Do they believe the enslaved black women, purposefully seduced their white men, did they think they wanted to be raped?

Are black women in the eyes of white women, the original whores, the quintessential sluts? A sickening set of propositions, but the institution of slavery was such a sick situation for women to be in.

An evil woman is easy to understand. Mistress Epps makes clear white women bound in slavery were far more complicated than pure evil. She is in a tumultuous rage.

Never ending pleasure in talking to him

A white woman’s rage: privileged with no position, positioned with no power, powerful with no promise of independence, fidelity or safety.

The white woman could not properly direct her rage at her husband, she could not rail against white male supremacy. She too was in hell and Black enslaved women where the only ones in the chambers bellow her. So she sent her rage down and with her hot hate burned what was left of the bitches.

And the black women scorched beyond human recognition were left in pieces scattered and buried somewhere beneath hell. The concept of hell, like slavery, was designed to control and terrorize for eternity. The relationship between the mistress and the slave woman was so poisoned from its inception it could never be healed.

Is this our original sin? Could this be at the root of why Black women were cut out of the American suffrage movement when it came time for voting rights for women? Why many white abolitionist women turned their backs on the violence against southern Blacks to secure their own right to vote?

Black and White American women were doomed from the start, viciously competitive, inhuman maddening

Women’s movements can’t move in America until we have courageous honest discourse about the sadistic historic foundation of the relationship. We were systematically cultured to distrust and envy each other. We were never meant to be sisters.

Black Violin (Classical Hip-Hop Duo): Broward to Broadway

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Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste of Black Violin pictured with Anne Sylvester and Corryn Freeman, the administrators of Black Violin Foundation Inc. -Photo by David I Muir
This story was originally published in Art Hive Magazine issue #32, Winter 2019.

By Tony Phillips
“There’s a book called The Blue Ocean,” Kev Marcus tells an enthusiastic audience
assembled on a recent Sunday afternoon at the Broward Center’s Porter Riverview
Ballroom. “It’s all about swimming in your own ocean instead of swimming with
everyone else.”

Marcus is one half of the classical and hip-hop duo Black Violin and he references this
book to introduce the first track from Black Violin’s fourth studio album entitled Take the
Stairs. The song is “Showoff” and Marcus says, “It’s us doing that thing nobody else
knows quite how to do.”

Marcus and Wil Baptiste, the other half of Black Violin, met in 1996 a few miles
northwest at Dillard High School of the Performing Arts on their first day of a two-week
summer orchestra intensive. “My mama made me do it,” Marcus explains while shouting
out his mother in the audience, “but when we got to Dillard, it was considered cool, so I
made friends.”

One of those friends was Baptiste, who remembers meeting Marcus at summer school while still a student at Sunrise Middle School. “He was sitting next to me,” recalls Baptiste.  “I was first chair and he was second.”

“You were not first chair!” Marcus interjects.

“I saw all these wood instruments,” Baptiste remembers, “and thought I’m clearly in the
wrong class. I tried to go to the band section, but they told me no, you’re in this class. I
was mad. I wanted to play sax, you know, John Coltrane, the cool stuff. It took me a day
and a half to even pick up a violin, but after a week, I loved it. It made me feel different.”

“People’s perception of me changed,” he recalls of both their full scholarships to Florida universities. “I would tell people I got a scholarship for violin and they’d say, ‘Really? You?’ They could not believe we could play at the level we could. That’s how Black Violin came together, but it all started with my mama.”

Their creativity and flare didn’t stop there, always creating, always evolving. Baptiste notes, “Even back in those days, we were always doing cool stuff to stay in our instruments. I remember Kev wrote this song on his phone using Busta Rhymes’ song “Gimme Some More.” I was like, ‘Damn, you got a phone!’ But then he taught everyone else and we went to competitions playing this song.”

Cut to 2005 and another competition, NBC’s nationally televised Showtime at the
Apollo, performing in front of what Marcus calls, “the hardest audience on the planet.”
Black Violin was paying its dues on the club scene before Mo’Nique announced their
victory. “I don’t even know how we found the money,” Marcus recalls, “we were so
broke, but five of us flew to New York. It was the real thing. We rubbed the log and won
four times.”

Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste of Black Violin pictured with Anne Sylvester and Corryn Freeman, the administrators of Black Violin Foundation Inc. -Photo by David I Muir

“That was the start of our career.” Marcus continues, “Slowly, over many years, we had to build up to this and prove to people that two brothers playing the violin is something your theater wants to book. Since then, we’ve played Broadway, gone to Iraq and performed for our troops and played Obama’s inauguration.”

Today, Black Violin now collaborates with local and national education programs like TurnAround Arts and connects with more than 100,000 students a year, mostly at low income and Title 1 schools.

“What is it that Uncle Ben says to Spiderman?” Marcus asks. “We didn’t even think about how kids would react to it. We were just trying to do us, but after not too long, we knew that we had them in our hands, so we had to say something to them.”

The Black Violin Foundation is a non-profit whose mission is helping emerging young musicians make music in a way it’s never been made before. Marcus’ wife, Anne Sylvester

Dream event; Principal Latosha Williams of Bethune Elementary with an orchestra student.-Photo by David I Muirserves as the Foundation’s president. The organization presents performance workshops for students that accompany Black Violin’s 150 shows a year. It also awards music scholarships and provides musical instruments to individuals or programs in need and strives to empower youth by working with them in their communities to provide access to music programs that foster creativity and innovation. Baptiste’s wife, Corryn Freeman is the Foundation’s Vice President.

“They were struggling,” Sylvester remembers of Black Violin’s early years, “but they had the drive. They were working hard. It wasn’t like, ‘Oh, we think we want to do this.’ They were passionate about it so you could see the potential.”

The band is just back in town after two weeks on the road, the outer limit both wives place on touring. The Impossible Tour, which takes its name from the Take The Stair track “The Impossible Possible,” will see Black Violin back out on the road for another two weeks launching their new album in New York.

Kev Marcus and Wil Baptiste of Black Violin – Photo by David I Muir

“We’re learning as we go,” Sylvester laughs, including her BVF vice president Corryn Freeman. But from how successful the work they’re doing is, you wouldn’t know it.

TC TRASH ART, Trash to Treasure

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By Ashleigh Walters

This story was originally published in Art Hive Magazine issue #32, Winter 2019.

 

Dozens of shoes.
A used toothbrush.
A mailbox.
There isn’t a kitchen sink in the mix *yet,* but if any interesting form of beach
trash gets in the path of two determined South Florida friends, it will be transformed into art.

About three times a week, Rebecca Fatzinger and Cristina Maldonado set out independently. They stroll a combined 13 miles of coastline, scooping up trash from beaches. Maldonado walks a more remote stretch, from Normandy Beach to Middle Cove Beach, and finds what she labels “Ocean Trash.” Fatzinger goes
from Bathtub Reef Beach to Jensen Beach, where she finds “Lazy Local Trash.”  They haul it all home, assess the scraps, and save the most interesting pieces out of the recycling and trash bins.

Their collaborations become creative sculptures,
from The Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album cover, to a wild gorilla, to topical messages regarding the Parkland School shooting, offshore drilling, and Bahamas relief efforts. They call it “TC Trash Art.”

While the friends have never kept track of the sheer volume of trash they’ve
collected during the years, they have witnessed the complexity of the issue
of beach and ocean trash. They’ve found crates carried in currents from both
Africa and Spain.

Sadly, they’ve also found dead fish trapped inside plastic
objects and a dead sea turtle with fishing line around its flipper.

“What started off as a silly hobby has become a bit of an obsession. Our goal
has always been to inspire others to get out and do beach clean ups. Once you
do beach clean ups often enough, it changes your lifestyle and you become
much more self-conscious of your plastic consumption,” Maldonado explained.
Beautiful, quirky, and unexpected; the impressions left by TC Trash Art are
anything but disposable.

CONNECT WITH TC TRASH ART
INSTAGRAM: @TCTrashArt + @TCTrashArtTrash
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/TCTrashArt + facebook.com/DailyTrashHauls

CONNECT WITH ASHLEIGH WALTERS
TWITTER: @AshleighWalters
FACEBOOK: facebook.com/ashleightv

 

 

 

Ashleigh Walters (www.AshleighWalters.net) is a painter and Anchorwoman at WPTV
NewsChannel 5, seen across Florida’s Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. WPTV is
committed to PROTECTING PARADISE, by raising awareness of environmental issues and
showing what’s being done to improve the quality of life in Florida.

Find extensive coverage at WPTV.com/ProtectingParadise

Center For Creative Education

0
This story was originally published in Art Hive Magazine issue #32, Winter 2019.

In our a technology-driven world, Palm Beach County may not be Silicon Valley, but the Center for Creative Education is doing their part in preparing students to complete and succeed in this very evolving world. According to the website Palm Beach Tech, “Palm Beach County will become a premiere technology and innovation hub by 2030.”

The digital arts and media programs at the Center for Creative Education (CCE) is currently preparing middle and high school aged youth to lead the charge for this to happen. CCE is providing
students with equipment and software that are standards within the industry, they are applying these new skills to real life projects.

Their recently completed homeless documentary titled ‘Unwelcome’ is a student-made project about homeless young adults in Palm Beach County. CCE Instructors work with students on every aspect of film production.

Students work to complete projects that include movie posters, films, animation, websites, and even musical compositions in an on-site computer lab and recording studio. Throughout this process, students collaborate with peers, communicate clearly, think critically, and most importantly, they are encouraged to be creative. The value of taking on social issues, like homelessness, lies in the meaningful connections students create between themselves and the issues. Students are then capable to form their own opinions and think about creative solutions for not only homelessness but for many other social issues facing our world today.

The ability to make connections and to apply creative solutions are skills required in our 21st Century global economy where the creative capital of our youth will dictate our future success in maintaining our position of world leadership. The incredible challenge of training students today for the jobs of tomorrow is not lost on CCE.

While CCE provides students access to state-of-the-art hardware and software, it is provided in an environment where they are expected to demonstrate initiative and self-direction, leadership, adaptability, and accountability. These are the skills that will lead to the success of today’s students as they adapt to jobs and challenges of the future.

Much of the work created in this program is often displayed at the center’s art gallery or shown in their 175-seat digital theater, providing the public the opportunity to see the efforts and to hear the voices of our future leaders. Open enrollment is available for all middle and high school-aged youth seeking after school opportunities. The Center for Creative Education may be reached at 561-805-9927 or by email at info@cceflorida.org.

Center for Creative Education
425 24 th Street
West Palm Beach, FL 33407
561-805-9927 / info@cceflorida.org / www.cceflorida.org
Follow CCE on Social Media
Facebook (@cce.florida), Twitter (cceflorida), Instagram (cceflorida), and YouTube (CCE Florida)

Student Testimonials:
“…I learned that working well with my peers is a vital part of film making, and the arts in general. I am so thankful that I was able to experience this digital media class, and I recommend it to anyone who wants to have fun and learn a bunch!”
– Kayli

“My digital media class at CCE was amazing. Throughout the months that I had classes there, I always had a fun and amazing time and always felt important and listened to.”
– Mary

Boynton Beach Art Adding To New Energy and Unifying Vision For 2020

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Cavalcade Albert Paley
By Joanie Cox-Henry
This story was originally published in Art Hive Magazine issue #32, Winter 2019.

Cavalcade Albert Paley

The Albert Paley Cavalcade sculpture sits proudly in front of the 500 Ocean apartments in Boynton Beach. This vibrant 40 foot high artwork is not only the tallest public art in Palm Beach County, but after being installed in the fall of 2017, it was an indicator of the larger than life art movement currently thriving in this burgeoning city.The City of Boynton Beach Art in Public Places recently presented the launch of its 2019-2020 Avenue of the Arts exhibit: Color Effects with artist Cecilia Lueza. The dynamic solo exhibit offers five geometric sculptures showcasing the resilience of community and environmental awareness within that group. The sculptures range from a bold ocean wave-inspired piece at Dewey Park to the thought-provoking Dual Nature sculpture in the 200 block of East Ocean Avenue.

“The Avenue of the Arts exhibit will connect the community and bring local and national
attention to the Town Square Redevelopment Project,” said Debby Coles-Dobay, Public
Arts Manager for City of Boynton Beach. “Beginning Nov. 30, we are offering free
docent-led tours of the five sculptures including access to an Otocast app that connects
tour goers to hear the artist talk about her artworks. The debut of the tours also
coincides with Small Business Saturday, which will be a wonderful way to support the
local businesses in this area. In fact, special discounts and deals from area business
will be available to tour attendees who RSVP in advance.”

With Boynton now known as a “Kinetic Art” city, the exhibitions annually coming to
Avenue of The Arts are attracting locals and tourists alike. This International Kinetic Art
Biennial, which is in its fourth year and next set for 2020-2021, has garnered the
attention of local international artists and art patrons to engage in art that moves,
interacting art experiences and more.

“The Color Effects exhibit is going to continue bring a really good crowd to this area,”
said Amanda Johnson, owner of Amanda James Gallery located at 400 Gulfstream
Blvd., in Boynton Beach. “The Color Effects exhibition is really colorful and the artist is
female, which is powerful. It’s taking Boynton to a new level and promoting and inspiring
artful living for all ages.”

Johnson is also the emerging public artist who created the “Deep Ocean & Shore Reef”
Parking Garage project for Town Square, which is slated to open in spring of 2020. “I
was selected to design the south parking garage in the new town square,” Johnson
said. “My design has a connection to the ocean and amazing reef and marine life in
Boynton Beach. Working with Debby, she really helped me learn what it means to serve
the community as an artist and helped me highlight what makes Boynton Beach so
special.”

In addition to the “Deep Ocean Shore Reef” garage, The Public Art in the Town Square
Redevelopment Project is going to offer five stunning pieces of public art including:
Community Heartbeat Fire & Rescue Station Window Mural slated for completion in
January 2020. Created by artist Lynn Doyle, this vibrant piece depicts Boynton Beach
Fire Rescue Department’s infinite connection with its citizens.

“Building Up Community” Police Station Public Art Plaza is targeted for completion in
March 2020. Designed by Krivanek+Breaux/Art + Design, this inspirational public aimed
at promoting safety and harmony in the community will be located at 2080 High Ridge
Road neighboring the Fire Station #5. E.O.C. is the new City Police Headquarters.
Crafted by internationally beloved sculptor, Ralfonso, “Meet me at the Kinetic Art Plaza”
the 27’ high x 26’ wide stainless steel kinetic sculpture titled “Reflections,” is gearing up
to be finished in March 2020. To represent Boynton Beach’s infinite diversity, the twenty
one 3′ to 11’ long bird-like wings rotate with the wind and intersect with each other
representing the flow and unity in nature.

“The Reef” Play Art Installation is estimated to be finished by June of 2020. This
interactive piece by The Urban Conga will utilize sight, sound, touch and movement to
promote social interaction among children in front of the Schoolhouse Children’s
Museum courtyard.

As an added feature, at night, this art inspired by ocean reef marine
life will change colors for a unique experience that will stimulate the senses.
Donald Gialanella is the artist behind “Synesthesia” Interactive Art Plaza On the south
side of East Ocean Avenue. Scheduled to be done by June 2020, this sculpture
consists of eight 10 foot tall vertical stainless steel tubes arranged in a 20-foot diameter
circular array. Geared toward people of all abilities, ages and demographics to engage
and connect, people will be encouraged to snap selfies by the reflective mirror-polished
surfaces of this art work. This installation piece is so high tech, as people approach it,
proximity sensors are activated and emit sounds from Boynton’s coastal environment.

“Natural Narrative” – PBC Cultural Council Exhibition Celebrates Nature

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Joel Cohen, “Bottle Palm” (detail), 2019, photograph on archival textured paper

Joel Cohen, “Bottle Palm” (detail), 2019, photograph on archival textured paper

The Cultural Council for Palm Beach County will soon open its newest exhibition, “Natural Narrative”, on Feb. 14 at its headquarters in downtown Lake Worth Beach.

There are many reasons why people move to Palm Beach County—the amazing weather, exciting arts and culture, and a variety of outdoor experiences. With this growth in population comes a need to explore the impact on local environment. This exhibition features installations, photography and other visual interpretations of each artist’s perspective on the topic of nature.

Curated by Nichole M. Hickey, “Natural Narrative” runs through May 30, 2020 and highlights works by the following 17 Palm Beach County artists:

  • Anthony Burks, Sr.
  • Joel Cohen
  • Marleen De Waele-De Bock
  • Arlene Florence
  • Nicole Galluccio
  • Peggy Greenfield
  • Lucy M.F. Keshavarz
  • James Knill
  • Allison Kotzig
  • Tina Kraft
  • Franne Lee
  • Cynthia Maronet
  • Frank Navarrete
  • Barry Seidman
  • Shannon S. Torrence
  • Carin Wagner
  • Camilla Webster

 

“Palm Beach County is home to incredible ecosystems,” said Dave Lawrence, president & CEO. “From sea turtle nesting beaches to the Everglades, our natural world is a source of life and inspiration for many — including talented local artists. We’re honored to celebrate our precious environment through ‘Natural Narrative.’”

Proceeds from artwork sales during the exhibition directly benefit local artists and support the Council’s mission to grow arts and culture in Palm Beach County.

Exhibition Details

The Council will host a member preview on Thursday, Feb. 13 from 5:30-7:30 p.m. (free for Council members; $20 for nonmembers). The event will feature live music by singer/songwriter Rio Peterson, refreshments and more.

To RSVP for the member preview, please email Debbie Calabria, director of membership and special events, at dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com or online here.

Sponsors include The Frances and Jeffrey Fisher Charitable Foundation, Inc.; The Palm Beach Post; and Art Hive Magazine. Member preview sponsors include Christafaro’s; The Paradise Express; and Tito’s Handmade Vodka.

The exhibition will also feature four artist lectures at the Council’s headquarters. Lectures are held at the Council’s headquarters from 3-5 p.m. and are free to attend (dates/times subject to change; visit the Council’s website for updates).

  • March 14: Camilla Webster
  • March 21: James Knill
  • April 11: Franne Lee
  • May 16: Joel Cohen

If You Go

Who: Cultural Council for Palm Beach County
What: “Natural Narrative” exhibition
When: Feb. 14 through May 30 (Tuesdays-Fridays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Saturdays, noon to 5 p.m.)
Where: Cultural Council for Palm Beach County (601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth Beach, FL 33460)

Cost: Free

Delray Beach Open: Enjoying the Art of Tennis

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February, 21 - Delray Beach: The Bryan Brothers(USA) defeat the team of Mannarino and Nys 63 75 at the 2019 Delray Beach Open by Vitacost.com in Delray Beach, FL.

If you think the Delray Beach Open by VITACOST.com is just the world’s best tennis players competing during 10-days of riveting matches this winter, think again. Yes, more than 60,000 fans will gather right here in Delray Beach while more than 50 hours of live TV will be broadcast day and night to the world. However, the excitement off-the-court is building too as musicians and local artists will be featured at the upcoming annual event. Look for works by both SoFL favorites and emerging artists who are bringing the local art scene to new heights of creativity.  Taking place February 14-23, 2020 at the Delray Beach Stadium & Tennis Center (201 West Atlantic Avenue), there will also be VIP fêtes, a VIP Lounge & Game Room, top-shelf dining and drinking, a new Craft Beer & Bubbly Bar, along with live music to enjoy while viewing the art exhibits.                                                                                                                                                                                          Of course, the Delray Beach Open by VITACOST.com will feature plenty of top tier talent in tennis as well. The ATP Champions Tour event (February 14-16) showcases tennis legends in a team format, with David Ferrer, James Blake, Tommy Haas, Marcos Baghdatis and other greats vying for the team title.  The ATP 250 event (February 17-23) gathers the game’s reigning stars – Juan Martin del Potro, Kei Nishikori, Nick Kyrgios, Milos Raonic, and the final appearance by the Bryan Brothers who recently announced that 2020 will be their final year on Tour. Also, special for the 2020 edition of Delray Beach penO, international sensation Coco Gauff returns to her home court to play an exhibition match on Saturday night, February 15.

February, 21 – Delray Beach: The Bryan Brothers(USA) defeat the team of Mannarino and Nys 63 75 at the 2019 Delray Beach Open by Vitacost.com in Delray Beach, FL.

“The tournament is as much about sharing the riches we’re blessed with locally – the artists, musicians and creative thinkers – as it is about gathering and watching the best tennis athletes from around the world,” explained John Butler, Executive Director of the Delray Beach Open.

 

Ticket options include budget-friendly reserved seats, courtside box seats, on-court “Best Seats” and covered Veranda Seats.

Individual tickets starting at $30. For more information, visit YellowTennisBall.com or call 561-330-6000.

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